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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been playing with the idea of replacing my 2018 Quadrifoglio with a newer one built after 2020, in order to avoid the carbon buildup problems that are inherent to DI engines.

But wow they were expensive....almost all of them in the sixties and seventies....low miles but they were not new cars.....

And then I found this dealer in Georgia with 2022 Quads in the low seventies......incredible.......!!!

At the same time I am worried about it….why do they need to discount them like that?

I recently visited a Hyundai dealer to check the new Gv70 Genesis SUV…..some trims were more expensive that those discounted Quad. It’s a nice SUV with good acceleration but nothing to compare to a Quad…..

and they have like waiting lists for them….and they are selling well above the MSRP….
 

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Same similar discounts were available in 2019. They produced many more SQVs in 2022 than GQVs which may explain part of the problem. Like all other manufacturers, Alfa is having problems moving product with economy slowing down and interest rates going up. Surprised they haven't just offered 0% for 60 months to increase foot traffic. Additional contributing issues is the lack of options available on vehicles that are now stickered in the mid 90s. Were it not for my love of the engine and handling I would have looked elsewhere. It is a great time to buy if you are paying cash.
 

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San Fransico used to have 4 dealers, now I can only find 2, and they aren't actually in SF. My dealer, McKevitt in Oakland, no longer sells or services (warranty) Alfas. The closest dealer is in Marin. And I asked them once if they would do an oil change on my 15k miles Giulia and they told me I had to have a 20k service for $1000+.

I checked the Marin dealers inventory, they also sell Ferraris, and they were flush with new and used Alfas.
 

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2018 Stelvio Quad
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I'd be willing to bet that the 2023s will be heavily discounted in less than a year due to the updated stelvio coming out. Right off the bat, it has a fully digital dash and led headlights. Both of which are pretty much standard on normal cars now and were nice to have back in 2017.

They really need to update the rear looks too but I guess the good news is that they will keep the current bodystyle for at least a few more years.

The carbon build up thing still hasnt hit really hard. So far, knock on wood, I have never experienced carbon problems on any di car I've owned. Maybe I get rid of them too soon but my wife had a di car to 130k and still, no cel or anything. Replacing a good running alfa with an unproven one might be a bad move. There are tons of 2020+ owners here that have had engine or drive train problems. Just saying.
 

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2019 was the peak of quality control in the Auto industry. Not a joke.

Don't forget about the Grecale, starts about $10k more with a nicer interior and every available option anyone has ever asked for on a Stelvio pretty much. (Interestingly the paint selection is still lame compared to Alfa a year or two ago)

The dynamics difference shrinks alot when you get into the better trims of the Grecale too. The V6 sounds great still, if not as raw. That has to be effecting Alfa sales and discounting.

Giulia sales have been dropping, but Stelvio sales weren't dropping by much.... Then the Grecale came out. Alfa sales dropped by a lot... Might be co-inky-dinkle, might not.



Was reading an analyst's predictions on the market and they had an interesting take:


Some brands will continue to have short supply, most cars sold at sticker or above, sold, then ordered and delivered at a later date.


Other brands will have cars on the lot, those brands will sell at or below sticker.

The availability of cars on the lot is what will differentiate the "discounted" brand from the "sticker-price" brands in any given market, whether it be "premium" or not.

IMO... Alfa is being setup to be a discounted, premium brand. Limited options with cars on lots.

Maserati will be mostly ordered and more expensive. Otherwise they will become similar brands skewed toward different ends of the same market. Alfa will basically overlap between Dodge and Maserati as far as Stellantis "performance" brands in North America. Some Alfa's will be rebadged Maser's, some rebadged Dodges. (Hopefully not all rebadged Dodge's)

That is one development that probably isn't bad for the brand long term, might get more in people's hands where they can learn how good the cars are. (Ya know.. since Stellantis seems to not be willing to do a 10 year powertrain warranty....)
 

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There are amazing QV deals in the mid to high sixties now, I know because I have been looking as well. The thing is I'm trying to weigh my options on whether to take that heavy depreciation; it looks like 18s (4 years older than the 22s) with 60K miles are dropping to $40K. So if we looked at a delta of $70K (MY22) to $40K (MY18, 60K miles which is about what I would do over 4 years) is it worth the 30K depreciation? I'm not sure.
 

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2022 montreal green quad
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The 2020+ cars also have the updated infotainment and interior. I'd also guess they have some of the earlier kinks worked out. Really no difference mechanically from 20-22 so I'd be looking at mileage, color, and options. 20 and 21 still had the alcantara seats and interior color options. Could also still get the carbon fiber grill and mirror caps. 22 the options went way down and the standard seats are just the ones out of the veloce. 22 has the unique exterior colors though - Ocra, montreal green, and the gta red. Of course if you buy a new 22 then you get the full warranty and know the car's history.

Not sure where the "tons of 2020+ owners having problems" comes from as that isn't what I've seen on here and giulia forums.
 

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2022 Veloce Ocra GT with Active Assist Plus
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There are amazing QV deals in the mid to high sixties now, I know because I have been looking as well. The thing is I'm trying to weigh my options on whether to take that heavy depreciation; it looks like 18s (4 years older than the 22s) with 60K miles are dropping to $40K. So if we looked at a delta of $70K (MY22) to $40K (MY18, 60K miles which is about what I would do over 4 years) is it worth the 30K depreciation? I'm not sure.
I wouldn't hesitate on a new '22 QV if you can find one in the low $70's, or even high $70's, as seems to be the going rate in parts of the Midwest. In other parts of the U.S., '22 QV models still list for $93K MSRP.

Heck, a loaded '23 Veloce can be $63K. A delta of $10-15k makes a QV a no brainer in my opinion.

Also, starting with the 2020 refresh, QV's have both direct injection AND port injection which would pretty much eliminate any potential with carbon build-up on lightly driven vehicles. Plus, you get the benefit of the factory warranty which has a lot of value on an expensive European built semi-exotic with a $30,000 Ferrari derived motor.
 

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Can somebody advise of the difference between the early red colors (alfa red or tri-color? red) and the newer gta red? Are there three red options across all the years?
Alfa Rosso (I believe you’re calling Alfa red) is a non-metallic red and has remained unchanged. Rosso competizione was a three part “candy color” like the current Ocra and verde Montreal. The “GTA red” Rosso Etna is a metallic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Yu my
I wouldn't hesitate on a new '22 QV if you can find one in the low $70's, or even high $70's, as seems to be the going rate in parts of the Midwest. In other parts of the U.S., '22 QV models still list for $93K MSRP.

Heck, a loaded '23 Veloce can be $63K. A delta of $10-15k makes a QV a no brainer in my opinion.

Also, starting with the 2020 refresh, QV's have both direct injection AND port injection which would pretty much eliminate any potential with carbon build-up on lightly driven vehicles. Plus, you get the benefit of the factory warranty which has a lot of value on an expensive European built semi-exotic with a $30,000 Ferrari derived motor.
I agree with you 100 percent….I just traded my 2018 Quad for a 2022 brand new Quad in the mid seventies.

If you do an internet search in Autotrader you will find out that Alfa of Marietta in Georgia has lots of 2022 Quads in the mid seventies. I think they may have the lowest priced Quads in the US right now.
 

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Not sure where the "tons of 2020+ owners having problems" comes from as that isn't what I've seen on here and giulia forums.
Here's just what I found after scrolling down a few times..






I'm know there is a ton sub 2020 MY problems but it just sure seems like there has been nothing but 2020+ brand new quads with really unhappy owners. I'm willing to bet that the 2020+ is no more reliable or problem free than the sub 2020 models. Also, maybe I missed it but I have not seen one confirmed carbon build up problem on a sub 2020 Quad since I joined this forum a few years ago.

If I could've gotten a 2020+ MY quad for what I paid, I would've but can we be honest here? I just can't get paying this side of $100K for what looks exactly like a 2018 MY car that can be had for around $50K with low miles. I got my quad 2 years ago with 9K of miles and is still under warranty for $57K and even then I still don't like the fact that it has HIDs, 2015 dash design and one seriously bad sounding audio system (I kind of fixed it). The performance is what I paid for and the newer ones for sure don't perform better. Just my 2 cents.

P.s. The 2020+ shifter is almost worth the price as the 2018 shifter is horrible. But I was able to swap a new version for less than $200. No coding required, its plug and play.. (and doing the Euro paddle shifter mod made me love my quad even more.)
 

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The reason for the emissions is to lower carbon emissions specifically the size of the particulate.

If you think thats a co-incidence... Good for you I guess. Smaller particulate is "better" (it does get absorbed by the cat better), and there is little doubt whatever build up the QV engine develops is blown out after a good drive, probably though that means higher carbon emissions particularly after start up. It's kinda like killing 2 birds with one stone.. which bird did you want to kill first? Does it matter? Got 2 birds!


The QV engines and Alfa's in general have less problems with carbon build up in terms of engine failure or loss of power then most similar engines from other manufacturers. Regardless there is the random/infrequent cold start misfire which is almost undoubtedly related to temporary build up, and is also by reports mostly solved with the addition of port injection (not just from Alfa, everyone that uses both)

Outside of that though ... Carbon issues are nominal at best. Many owners do not experience them and no argument the smog regulations have nothing to do with reliability or drivability. They are political machinations.

IMO pre-2020 Quads are the best performance deal on the market. Just understand, it might have random misfires that go way when the car is driven more. If that really bothers you get a newer one.. if it doesn't... Enjoy the savings. From my limited seat time I think QVs are the same as the base in terms of changes post-2020. Mostly the same but a little more refined and maybe a tiny bit less "fun" because of it... Less raw feeling. Could be good or bad depending on the driver's desires.
 

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Yu my


I agree with you 100 percent….I just traded my 2018 Quad for a 2022 brand new Quad in the mid seventies.

If you do an internet search in Autotrader you will find out that Alfa of Marietta in Georgia has lots of 2022 Quads in the mid seventies. I think they may have the lowest priced Quads in the US right now.
Ok pictures please and congrats.
 
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