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Be careful how easy you think it is.
While it is simple, it is not "easy".

To me easy means little risk of messing up and causing serious damage.

However if you are a klutz and clumsy with tools...there is a real possibility of doing damage to yourself or your car if the breaker bar slips while removing tension from the belt. I have seen damage to the car's hood as well as to the person holding the bar. The job is simple but it does require a certain level of strength and co-ordination. If you aren't comfortable with that dont feel bad for paying someone else to do it for you.

The tool for removing tension is called a breaker bar, not cause it breaks the car, but because if the tech loses control of it under tension...the bar will fly up with a ton of force and break the tech and anything else it hits.

Be careful.
 

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Be careful how easy you think it is.
While it is simple, it is not "easy".

To me easy means little risk of messing up and causing serious damage.

However if you are a klutz and clumsy with tools...there is a real possibility of doing damage to yourself or your car if the breaker bar slips while removing tension from the belt. I have seen damage to the car's hood as well as to the person holding the bar. The job is simple but it does require a certain level of strength and co-ordination. If you aren't comfortable with that dont feel bad for paying someone else to do it for you.

The tool for removing tension is called a breaker bar, not cause it breaks the car, but because if the tech loses control of it under tension...the bar will fly up with a ton of force and break the tech and anything else it hits.

Be careful.
Could'nt have said it better.
 

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Should be relatively compared to a soft tissue or full bony impaction. Flying instruments do a lot more harm to the body!
 

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This is definitely a DYI project it the dealer charges more than $50.
Indeed I changed it on my 911 Turbo so I think that it should be easier on the Stelvio, the 911 is really problem with the position of the flat six. I don't blame the dealer though. If the total cost is $700 inclusive of the remaining work this is probably 450 or so, pretty much right for 3 hours of work. Employees are expensive particularly the good one.
 

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2018 Stelvio Base 20" yellow calipers
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Here now: report is belt needs replaced- (heat from the turbo*), plugs, filter, oil, reflash/warranty. $600. I am still skeptical but following the advice given. Brake fluid and cabin filter 40K- again brake fluid due to severe use (and again not my application). Although I love the vehicle and realize you have to pay to play it does give me some concern about the cost of maintenance vs others I have owned (including high line brands).

* when the 2.0 turbo is used in mainstream brands this would seem to me to be unacceptable.
 
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This is a performance engine and the engineers have made the assumption that all buyers will drive hard, so they wrote the user manual with that in mind. These are also HOT engines and in the long run the excessive heat will affect other things as well. Generally speaking all plastic or rubberized material will be the first to show signs of decay.
Having said that, I have never changed the brake fluid on any of my cars regardless of mileage, only topped it off.

The Macan also recommends changing the plugs early, which i really don't understand!! Some modern high performance plugs specifically made for high performance engines are rated for 100K miles!!
 

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Yeah, and often at 100k heat has fused them to the engine creating alot of problems for the tech and expense for the customer come tune up time.

Maybe see if there is an aftermarket belt made from a kevlar blend. It is pretty common, the part will cost more but it will last waaay longer.

I haven't looked for aftermarket serpentine belts yet, will try to do that soon.
 

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2018 Stelvio Base 20" yellow calipers
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Thinking about this- assuming the electric fan runs during stop/start but when a hot engine stops, cooling water stops circulating as well and heat builds. Obviously this was considered but at least some of the heat build-up would have to be aggravated in this cycle.
 

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I sure hope we start to see a DIY section soon. I have always done my own maintenance. Dealers and manufacturers cannot require you to use them exclusively in the US unless they provide the service and parts for free. Meaning you can do it yourself or pay a local shop if they have the tools or knowledge. Also they have to prove your lack of maintenance cause a part to fail. Not changing the oil and an engine failure is an example they would not cover. But if your radio goes, still covered. Im not replacing a serpentine belt at 36k never ever had one fail.
 

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A 2 liter 4 cylinder is hot enough, add a high pressure twin scroll turbo and you will get a great hot soup especially here in the balmy southwest. I always thought a shark gill air vent right behind the front wheel wells would not only look great but be functional as well. I will be content with the gills on top of the Quad hood as well.

If the wife decides to keep the Stelvio after the lease is up, I might change the hood with the one on the Quad.
 

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Thinking about this- assuming the electric fan runs during stop/start but when a hot engine stops, cooling water stops circulating as well and heat builds. Obviously this was considered but at least some of the heat build-up would have to be aggravated in this cycle.

Theoretically the engine will not activate the start/stop function if it needs cooling...theoretically...who knows how well it is implemented.

It's also not supposed to do it when the A/C is on high, but I've had that happen soo..

I think it has to do with how hot the engine runs, due to it being a pretty high strung turbo. Although I still say a Kevlar reinforced belt will last longer.
 

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As a follow-up, AR Customer Care provided the auxiliary (serpentine) drive belt part number for 2018 Stelvio with 2.0 liter engine: Mopar 68326262AA


IMG_1277.jpg


https://parts.moparonlineparts.com/...-romeo-belt-serpentine-68326261aa?parent=1001


To change this you must:

1) remove large air deflector below the engine compartment

2) remove 3 nuts holding a plastic shield for one of the lower pulleys

3) relieve pressure on the belt via a ratchet or torque tool installed in the belt tensioner and remove existing belt from one of the adjacent pulleys (please be sure to note auxiliary belt routing —- you might want to take some pictures before removing existing belt)

4) install new belt (routed correctly) relieving tension on the belt tensioner in similar fashion applied when removing belt in prior step

5) re-install belt shield

6) re-install bottom wind deflector

7) congratulate yourself for spending no more than 30 minutes to save what appears from this forum to be $300-$500 in dealer labor charges

8) order a spare belt for next replacement
and store out of direct sunlight as UV rays will affect these in similar fashion to tires
 

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It seems the dealership charges extra for parts and labor for all repairs. If you are not handy try to find a reputable mechanic who can do it for less money. The brakes seem to be expensive also I guess the rotors are disposable (cannot be cut) the usually replace the pad sensors, and brake pads costs like 700-800 at the dealer. Seems outrageous to me.
 

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Someone on this forum calls his Stelvio, as Stella ....... just like a pretty, and sexy woman who will put a smile on your face when you drive, but has ISSUES and will drain your wallet and your patience .... I'm glad mine is a lease and in essence I'm a sugar daddy to her ..... i will just pick up another babe as soon as all the maintenance gets to be a pain .... Leasing is the way to go on these babies. Besides who who knows if she will even be around in a couple of years.
 

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As a follow-up, AR Customer Care provided the auxiliary (serpentine) drive belt part number for 2018 Stelvio with 2.0 liter engine: Mopar 68326262AA


IMG_1277.jpg


https://parts.moparonlineparts.com/...-romeo-belt-serpentine-68326261aa?parent=1001


To change this you must:

1) remove large air deflector below the engine compartment

2) remove 3 nuts holding a plastic shield for one of the lower pulleys

3) relieve pressure on the belt via a ratchet or torque tool installed in the belt tensioner and remove existing belt from one of the adjacent pulleys (please be sure to note auxiliary belt routing —- you might want to take some pictures before removing existing belt)

4) install new belt (routed correctly) relieving tension on the belt tensioner in similar fashion applied when removing belt in prior step

5) re-install belt shield

6) re-install bottom wind deflector

7) congratulate yourself for spending no more than 30 minutes to save what appears from this forum to be $300-$500 in dealer labor charges

8) order a spare belt for next replacement
and store out of direct sunlight as UV rays will affect these in similar fashion to tires

THese are precisely the posts we need in the HOW TO section this forum now needs!! Thank you sir!!!
 

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Called my dealer for a 30K service quote on my TI. He initially said for the belt, plugs, brake oil, and oil/filter it would be 5K. I about dropped the phone, then he said oops sorry that is for the Quad!! Wow 5K is crazy, but I guess if you need to remove engine it may make sense. They quoted $900 for the TI. Still a lot.
 

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In reality, if they are iridium plugs....no change needed. Most vehicles have 100K intervals with Iridiums. Belt is overkill also. Seems the Italians have belt o phobia. Modern belts last 7-10 years on everything. Brakes are just labor and with a vacu bleed could be done in less than an hour. Modern vehicles need so little maintenance, and make so few trips back to the dealer, that it seems the Italians are creating opportunities. Same with my Maserati and my dealer even told me so!!! BTW also my Alfa dealer so after 30 years, they have a vested interest in being honest with me!
 

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Thanks VV, I am inclined to just do the brakes oil/filter and stay the course. I have 2 years and just over 20K left on the warranty...may purchase another TI then anyway.

How does one find out if they are iridium plugs?
 
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