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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2019 Stelvio QV with about 21k miles needs to have the rear brake pads and rotors replaced according to my dealer. The rotors are grooved so looks like they are shot. I was surprised to hear them say that it's because I baby the brakes and that the rear brakes bear the brunt of braking before the front brakes kick in when you brake lightly. In terms of driving style, I drive the Stelvio hard but try and avoid any hard braking, either letting off the accelerator a little earlier and occasionally engine braking. I've not had to replace rotors in other cars but this is my first true performance car (I did have a Giulia TI for over 30k miles with no brake issues).

I would have thought that hard braking would have caused the rear rotors to groove, rather than lighter braking. Anyone hear of this as a cause for rotor wear? Does 21k miles seem too early to have to replace the rotors? I saw from another post that the car sitting around not getting bought may cause rusting. I bought my 2019 in July 2020, so not sure if that possibly has something to do with it.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
 

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'18 TI Lusso AWD
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Mine has 21 k, and the rear rotors are fine.
Some things I’ve stumbled upon in this forum about rear brakes

Driving sporty in D may wear the rears faster
ACC may wear the rear brakes faster
Obviously there are environmental impacts like the rusty unused rotors, or maybe winter salt and long periods of un-use, that case more severe wear

fortunately you can still get rear rotors from the dealership
 

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There are so many variables that go into brake wear.....

20k isn't unusual, but isn't the most common either, seems like most members report better even on QV's.

Were I, you...I would get a brake inspection done at an independent place or another dealer. Should be cheap...might save you some cash.
 

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I have my theory that may apply to some drivers:
  • the rear brakes are a bit undersized for the weight of the car and the role they play in stability and traction control
  • it is easy to overdrive a corner because the beast handles well
  • get the braking done early and don’t use too much trail braking, power on early but smoothly to build boost
Would be interesting to see if LSD-equipped cars have the same wear rate. Alfa should have put race mode on all cars, it would make getting the feel of how the car behaves easier.

There are so many driver-specific variables. I had an 500hp XJL Super that ate rear brakes, My Stelvio rears lasted 35,000 miles and there was life left at the front. Suggest maybe NOT babying the brakes. They like heat to wear off rotor deposits. Smooth is the key, especially for driving a heavy, high CG vehicle that tricks us into thinking it is lower and lighter.
 

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Use the brake pedal like a Prius driver does the gas. If you want better life.


The quad doesn't really have the same undersized rears as the base. I think @Peter A wasn't thinking QV.

Also it has the LSD so less use of the brakes.

I wonder if the OP didn't ask the dealer what to do about the grooves rotors and was told replace them.

The grooves in and of them selves isn't a sign the rotors are bad.
 

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I've got a 2019 Quad and replaced the pads and fluid with OEM at about 16K miles. . . I tracked my Quad twice before this change and the original pads were clearly done. The dealership told me at that time that my rotors were warped and needed to be replaced (they wanted about $2500 for the whole job). I opted to NOT replace the rotors and then dealt with horribly squeaky stops (new pads + bad rotors = not good). . . so, since I'd like to track my Quad again, I replaced both the pads AND the rotors with EBC Yellowstuff pads and Girodisc rotors. This set-up is working very well, and I'll be sure to replace my brake fluid (again) with race fluid prior to my next track day.
And yes, I'm well aware that I'll continue to eat through tires, brakes, rotors and a slew of other parts when I track my Stelvio, but, damn, it's soooo much fun. YOLO :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, all, this is a great community.

ALFAOFFROAD, I was told by my dealer that the rotors couldn't be resurfaced and that they needed to be replaced. I took some pictures of the rotor where you can see the grooving. Any thoughts on whether I need to get them replaced? Also, would appreciate any quotes that anyone has gotten to replace two rotors/brake pads.
Automotive tire Wood Art Rim Automotive exterior
Automotive tire Automotive design Bumper Automotive exterior Rim
 

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They can't be resurfaced because even when they are brand new resurfacing would take away too much material and they would be bad after.

I'm exagerating but not by alot. Any wear pretty much and they can't be resurfaced.

Thinner rotors = less unsprung weight. Manufactuers make them thin, never to be resurfaced.

Unless the pads are needing replacement or the car was braking bad (shaking under braking) I wouldn't replace mine for that type of grooving. That looks like typical hard pads on soft rotors-type brake wear to me. My guess is the dealer was suggesting a brake job to solve your complaint about the appearance not any actual mechanical issue.

Not trying to say anything bad about your opinion. It's your car, just know that replace the brakes and you'll probably have the same wear in about the same miles with the new ones. (Unless you modify them by getting softer pads and harder rotors, which will effect how the car brakes)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
They can't be resurfaced because even when they are brand new resurfacing would take away too much material and they would be bad after.

I'm exagerating but not by alot. Any wear pretty much and they can't be resurfaced.

Thinner rotors = less unsprung weight. Manufactuers make them thin, never to be resurfaced.

Unless the pads are needing replacement or the car was braking bad (shaking under braking) I wouldn't replace mine for that type of grooving. That looks like typical hard pads on soft rotors-type brake wear to me. My guess is the dealer was suggesting a brake job to solve your complaint about the appearance not any actual mechanical issue.

Not trying to say anything bad about your opinion. It's your car, just know that replace the brakes and you'll probably have the same wear in about the same miles with the new ones. (Unless you modify them by getting softer pads and harder rotors, which will effect how the car brakes)
Actually, I didn't complain about the brakes to the dealer. I brought my car in for an oil change and on their own, they told me that I needed to replace my rear brakes/rotors soon (i.e., the next few months). Of course, I don't want to replace them if I don't need to. This goes beyond my knowledge so hence I posted on the forum. Sounds like you are saying that you don't see the grooving as a problem? And, I'm afraid that if I replace the rotors, the same thing will happen again after the same amount of miles, just like you said.
 

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So, I used Alfissimo to purchase new performance pads (EBC Yellowstuff) and rotors (Girodisc) and here's the invoice for the parts:
Product Font Rectangle Material property Screenshot


I used a local mechanic to do the install, and he charged me about $750.
For me, the advantage of the Girodisc two-piece rotors is that when they're ready to be replaced, I can just purchase new "rings" (much less expensive) instead of the entire rotor (ring+hat). Again, I track my Stelvio, so replacement is inevitable :)

Here's a pic of the set up (front and rear, stock wheel and tire sizes):
Tire Wheel Car Vehicle Automotive tire

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Hubcap
 

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My 2019 Stelvio QV with about 21k miles needs to have the rear brake pads and rotors replaced according to my dealer. The rotors are grooved so looks like they are shot. I was surprised to hear them say that it's because I baby the brakes and that the rear brakes bear the brunt of braking before the front brakes kick in when you brake lightly. In terms of driving style, I drive the Stelvio hard but try and avoid any hard braking, either letting off the accelerator a little earlier and occasionally engine braking. I've not had to replace rotors in other cars but this is my first true performance car (I did have a Giulia TI for over 30k miles with no brake issues).

I would have thought that hard braking would have caused the rear rotors to groove, rather than lighter braking. Anyone hear of this as a cause for rotor wear? Does 21k miles seem too early to have to replace the rotors? I saw from another post that the car sitting around not getting bought may cause rusting. I bought my 2019 in July 2020, so not sure if that possibly has something to do with it.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
Rear pads outer seems to wear a lot quicker than inner, known issue with the car
 

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My 2019 Stelvio QV with about 21k miles needs to have the rear brake pads and rotors replaced according to my dealer. The rotors are grooved so looks like they are shot. I was surprised to hear them say that it's because I baby the brakes and that the rear brakes bear the brunt of braking before the front brakes kick in when you brake lightly. In terms of driving style, I drive the Stelvio hard but try and avoid any hard braking, either letting off the accelerator a little earlier and occasionally engine braking. I've not had to replace rotors in other cars but this is my first true performance car (I did have a Giulia TI for over 30k miles with no brake issues).

I would have thought that hard braking would have caused the rear rotors to groove, rather than lighter braking. Anyone hear of this as a cause for rotor wear? Does 21k miles seem too early to have to replace the rotors? I saw from another post that the car sitting around not getting bought may cause rusting. I bought my 2019 in July 2020, so not sure if that possibly has something to do with it.

Thanks in advance for any thoughts.
I have Alfa Romeo Stelvio 2018 and over 50,000 miles on it and it’s just right now I have brake oases change light came up. I called to Seattle dealership service dep. (I like them better than kirkland) and the guy said that each set of brake pads approximately last for about 30,000-40,000 miles (I’m considered as light braker.) and he said that front usually wear faster. Before you need to change rear you need to change front about twice. So those who told you they try to reap you off. Their brake parts and labor cost over $1,000. Crazy. I would never change my brakes at dealership at that price. Lots of places can do it around $100.
 

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Thanks, all, this is a great community.

ALFAOFFROAD, I was told by my dealer that the rotors couldn't be resurfaced and that they needed to be replaced. I took some pictures of the rotor where you can see the grooving. Any thoughts on whether I need to get them replaced? Also, would appreciate any quotes that anyone has gotten to replace two rotors/brake pads. View attachment 25505 View attachment 25506
Wilderness auto at Mapple Valley, WA, ask Alex. Won’t charge a lot.
 

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Braking is the opposite of accelerating.

As such the act of doing so is the worst of all sins..... Light brakers are the only people who will get into heaven. ;)
Ha-ha.. thanks… well not my words but the mechanic’s at the dealership… me.. well it is hard to drive slow on this car.. 😅I can’t consider my self as light braker … but somehow I manage to have good pads until over 50 k:)
 
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