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Update: I had my Stelvio in for a service and told them about my dead battery and the Bluetooth call theory. They were able to confirm that the electrical stayed on after leaving the vehicle while on a Bluetooth connected call (even after the call was disconnected). There apparently was a software update fix, which they did. They conducted 6 test calls after the update on both an iPhone and Android phone and it seems to have resolved the issue.
 

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I had a similar electrical issues as described. 2k miles, 2021 QV.
First freezing temperature night of the year may of contributed, although the car was driven the day before. At attempted startup, plenty of codes flashed, then the car went to total electrical shutdown. Will investigate the battery as previously described, and report back.
Did get the issue resolved - as expected, the battery was low (I even managed to jump start). Even then, "service engine" light was on (no mode shifting possible - N only), so the car still had to go to the dealer. The battery passed the stress test - so I did not manage to get a replacement under warranty. No direct reason for battery discharge was given (I am assuming all of the codes that were shown were bogus). My suspect is remote start through Alfa/Guardian app. It works sporadically - but may turn on the electrical system fully, even when it does not start.

There were issues with the closest dealer (could not take me in for a month), so AR customer care approved a reimbursement to tow to a dealer that was further away, but could take me immediately. They also reimbursed my taxi ride to pick up the car (upon completion), although AR did not reimburse gratuity to the driver (weird, but ok). Either way I was without the car for less than a week, and (knock on wood) did not have a similar issue since. I do carry a voltmeter now and will periodically check battery levels.
 

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2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Ti Sport. Premium everything. Vesuvio Grey with Red interior
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I have a similar "Random Dead Battery" issue. Bought a 2018 Stelvio Ti Sport on New Years Eve 2019. Love the car. Everything was fine, as a long time car owner/enthusiast/DIYer (40+ years) would, I went to the appropriate forums (this one and giuliaforums.com) as well as read everything I could about the new Alfas. I own Torque (paid version), a bluetooth ODBII reader, MultiECUScan and a set of ODBII adapter cables for my laptop. I change my own oil, etc. You get the picture; I know my way around cars.

The first time I had a dead battery, just over a year into my Stelvio ownership, I attributed it to the OEM Varta battery finally giving up the ghost. I didn't want to bother with a trip to andealer who would most likely just replace it with another OEM battery, so I promptly went to a nearby Walmart and picked up an AGM battery. All was well... for a few months. Then one day, I came out to the car (parked in my garage as always) and it was completely dead again. Of course, my old battery charger wasn't charging the new AGM battery properly so I bought a new AGM compatible charger with a reconditioning option and plugged it in overnight. Next day car battery was fully charged. It was weird and I thought that I may have possibly gotten a bad battery but it held the charge and all was well, for over six months. I drove 5000 miles to Montana and back, went to Maine. Left the car at the Airport for a week. All of this without a problem. Then, today, I went to go for a quick drive to the gym and the car was stone cold dead. I hooked up the AGM charger, took another vehicle to the gym and left the Stelvio charging for a few hours. Later I needed to go out for dinner but the AGM charger had not revived the battery enough to turn the crank , so I jumped the Stelvio, went for takeout and when I came home hooked the car back up, just to ensure a full charge tomorrow.

So, this seems to be completely random and I am not sure what would be causing the batterynto drain.

I'll point out a few items of note:

I always keep my key fobs in a Faraday box.

I don't turn the car off while on a bluetooth call. Only after I hang up and disconnect (I don't get that many calls while I drive anyway so this is rarely an issue).

I did notice some insulation being gnawed on in the engine compartment today (this is new) mice have gotten into my garage in the past, usually just an annoyance like a stuffed air filter box in my wife's car once for example. In theory they could have gnawed on a wire and caused a short but it seems highly unlikely as the car now seems fine again.

Last night I left the liftgate up for five minutes after grocery shopping, the car was parked and turned off. But this has happened before without incident so I also don't think this is the issue but... full disclosure.

I take mostly short trips these days as I work from home since the pandemic. 5 to 10 minute trips.

The Auto stop/start has been disabled by by default through reprogramming so I have to push the button to turn it on, not off. I never turn it on.

I have installed front and rear Garmin mini dash cams hardwired but they have been there for most of my ownership and did not cause a battery issue even when the car was parked for a week at a busy airport lot. I know of no drainage issues related to this particular dash cam model.

I never drive in A mode (OK, I did use it once last winter when my oem tires were worn and the roads were wet and icy). Usually D or R, unless the wife is in the car, then it is N.

So, I'm stumped but I suspect taking it to the dealer (40 minutes one way), is a waste of time as the battery will be fully charged by the time I get there unless the alternator is dying.

Any ideas? @AlfaRomeoCares ?
 

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Honestly, if you read the thread, you have learned that since your car was built, there have been several replacement flashes, and you don't know if they have been applied to your Stelvio yet. It's worth taking the car to the dealership and describing the problem just to have them apply the latest flashes to your car, which might resolve the issue.

The couple hundred bucks spent getting the most recent flashes applied (if your car isn't still under warranty, that is) are better in comparison to the hassle of dealing with random dead batteries that you can't figure out the cause, and which might be resolved after the updates are performed.
 

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2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Ti Sport. Premium everything. Vesuvio Grey with Red interior
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Honestly, if you read the thread, you have learned that since your car was built, there have been several replacement flashes, and you don't know if they have been applied to your Stelvio yet. It's worth taking the car to the dealership and describing the problem just to have them apply the latest flashes to your car, which might resolve the issue.

The couple hundred bucks spent getting the most recent flashes applied (if your car isn't still under warranty, that is) are better in comparison to the hassle of dealing with random dead batteries that you can't figure out the cause, and which might be resolved after the updates are performed.
Thank you. I had read the thread but somehow, that particular piece of info didn't sink in.

My car is indeed under warranty. I don't much like the nearest dealer but I will schedule an appointment. The dead battery has been happening more frequently now, especially when I don't lock the car at night (which, why should I have to? My car is parked in a private garage, in a private house, out in the boonies, on a dead-end road "cul-de-sac") 🙃
 

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The dead battery has been happening more frequently now, especially when I don't lock the car at night (which, why should I have to? My car is parked in a private garage, in a private house, out in the boonies, on a dead-end road "cul-de-sac") 🙃
You know, it might just be worth locking the car for a week in the garage, just so that you can tell the dealer that this happens either when the car is left unlocked, or it happens both when locked, or left unlocked.

Just giving them that extra bit of information might allow the tech to pinpoint the module that isn't shutting down as expected.
 

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Hi all,

I just joined the Dead Battery Club yesterday. After normal driving, the car (2019 TI Sport) was parked overnight and the battery was completely dead in the morning. I had to use the metal key to unlock the door. There were no signs before it happened. I have a few months old AGM battery.

I know many members suggested that the root cause was the OEM battery but looks like it is not. Many members including me experienced sudden dead battery with new AGM batteries too. I am confident that there is a glitch somewhere in the system draining the battery. Although all the suggestions by the members make sense, I don't think they would prevent it from happening again and again...

I am fortunate to have many lux cars in my life BUT never experienced anything like this...

I was wondering if anyone has discovered the real root cause....

Thanks in advance!
 

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2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Ti Sport. Premium everything. Vesuvio Grey with Red interior
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You know, it might just be worth locking the car for a week in the garage, just so that you can tell the dealer that this happens either when the car is left unlocked, or it happens both when locked, or left unlocked.

Just giving them that extra bit of information might allow the tech to pinpoint the module that isn't shutting down as expected.
I have been doing that. It seems to be okay if I lock it. Of course, lately, I have been getting nervous and plugging the car into a charger overnight. I have an appointment with the Dealer (Ramsey NJ Alfa Romeo) on June 7, so we'll see what they say. I guess I'll have to set it back to stock tune for the visit. ;)
 

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2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Ti Sport. Premium everything. Vesuvio Grey with Red interior
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69 Posts
Hi all,

I just joined the Dead Battery Club yesterday. After normal driving, the car (2019 TI Sport) was parked overnight and the battery was completely dead in the morning. I had to use the metal key to unlock the door. There were no signs before it happened. I have a few months old AGM battery.

I know many members suggested that the root cause was the OEM battery but looks like it is not. Many members including me experienced sudden dead battery with new AGM batteries too. I am confident that there is a glitch somewhere in the system draining the battery. Although all the suggestions by the members make sense, I don't think they would prevent it from happening again and again...

I am fortunate to have many lux cars in my life BUT never experienced anything like this...

I was wondering if anyone has discovered the real root cause....

Thanks in advance!
Try doing what I am doing; Lock the car overnight. It seems to be OK when I lock the car. If there is a software fix, I'll find out when I bring mine in on June 7.
 

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I was wondering if anyone has discovered the real root cause....
The one thing that you need to remember is that what may have been the solution for one person and their car may not always be the same solution for you and your car.
There have been so many different code iterations to cover a variety of problems, that you can't really compare two cars, unless they just rolled off the assembly line within a few hours of each other.

Pretty much, the only way to determine what the problem is is to have all the fuse block covers off, and shut down the car.
Wait about 30 minutes, and scan the fuse blocks with an infrared camera to see if one of the fuses is hotter than all the rest.
If you're lucky, you will be able to find the fuse that has the most power going through it.
If you are lucky, then you can determine what modules and parts of your car are fed by that fuse, and start your troubleshooting there.

If you wanted to go further, you could pull the positive battery terminal, and connect a digital volt meter between the terminal and the lead, with the range set to milliamps, and watch for the amount of power draw after you shut off the car, and after it goes into deep sleep mode. If you see a large draw at that point, you can search with your infrared camera in the fuse block for the source of the draw, or you can start pulling fuses to the fuses that have some of the higher draws, and see which fuse causes the drain to vanish on the DVOM.

Again, the idea is to narrow down the source of the draw, and then go from there.

Maybe there's a flash for that module or part due to the large draw.
Maybe you need to replace that module or part due to it being faulty, or there was a production replacement because of this issue.

You just never know until you do your best to become a diagnostician.

BC.
 

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The one thing that you need to remember is that what may have been the solution for one person and their car may not always be the same solution for you and your car.
There have been so many different code iterations to cover a variety of problems, that you can't really compare two cars, unless they just rolled off the assembly line within a few hours of each other.

Pretty much, the only way to determine what the problem is is to have all the fuse block covers off, and shut down the car.
Wait about 30 minutes, and scan the fuse blocks with an infrared camera to see if one of the fuses is hotter than all the rest.
If you're lucky, you will be able to find the fuse that has the most power going through it.
If you are lucky, then you can determine what modules and parts of your car are fed by that fuse, and start your troubleshooting there.

If you wanted to go further, you could pull the positive battery terminal, and connect a digital volt meter between the terminal and the lead, with the range set to milliamps, and watch for the amount of power draw after you shut off the car, and after it goes into deep sleep mode. If you see a large draw at that point, you can search with your infrared camera in the fuse block for the source of the draw, or you can start pulling fuses to the fuses that have some of the higher draws, and see which fuse causes the drain to vanish on the DVOM.

Again, the idea is to narrow down the source of the draw, and then go from there.

Maybe there's a flash for that module or part due to the large draw.
Maybe you need to replace that module or part due to it being faulty, or there was a production replacement because of this issue.

You just never know until you do your best to become a diagnostician.

BC.
Thanks for your input. Definitely your suggestions make sense.
Although I agree with you that each car is different, my gut fleeting is telling me all/most of the vehicles suffering from sudden death battery syndrome share the same problem…
 

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Thanks for your input. Definitely your suggestions make sense.
Although I agree with you that each car is different, my gut fleeting is telling me all/most of the vehicles suffering from sudden death battery syndrome share the same problem…
Gut feelings are great, and sometimes can be right, but the problem is that gut feelings don't narrow down the actual problem.

You are most likely correct that there was a common problem or 5 in the early years, and Alfa probably changed suppliers to eliminate the issue, because newer cars don't experience as many randomly drained battery issues as the early cars did.

The problem is, there have been so many parts that HAVE changed since 2017, that it's nearly impossible to determine which one is the cause.
Maybe the battery is the cause, maybe its the BCM like AlfaOffRoad says.
Maybe its wiring connections that get corrosion in them, that then causes issues with the modules downstream of them getting poor connections causing the issues.
I mean, hell, if the battery, which is in the damn trunk, under floor paneling, can get corrosion on the battery terminals during delivery from Italy to the US, then all those connectors that are actually outside in the elements should be a complete mess.

And its not like FCA has the best history when it comes to wiring, connector, ground point, and fuse block corrosion issues over many, many different products over the past several decades.

Again, the trick is to diagnose the issue as it happens, in a methodical manner.

I recommend watching a YouTube channel like South Main Auto, DiagnoseDan or Pine Hollow Auto Diagnostics to learn how to hunt down electronics issues.

BC.
 
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