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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2018 Stelvio Quadrifoglio with 14,200 miles. Began throwing the EOBD System Failure warning light last week, accompanied by "Service Engine" and "Injection System Failure" messages. Thought perhaps it could be related to the well-known battery failures but the original battery was replaced at my dealership two years ago and I have kept it on a A-R battery tender. Won't run outside of "N" mode when it happens. Always use ethanol-free premium gas.
But the problem is not constant. After it sits a while it has run normally (in all modes) before failing again after a short drive of about 20 miles.
Any thoughts about this out there?
 

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The "European On-Board Diagnostic" system is a secondary on-board diagnostics system that functions specifically to monitor engine functions related to emissions.

It may just be a sensor or some other stupid thing. It may also mean something is happening in the engine that can cause significant damage to it or the catalytic converter.

I'de make an appointment at the dealer...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I thought as much. It'll be interesting to see where they trace it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Here's an update:

Took it to the dealer (Dave Smith in Coeur d'Alene, ID; great outfit that I can highly recommend, and lucky to have Thomas as the service technician - he knows his stuff!) this week. He diagnosed the issue as a faulty crankcase pressure sensor, which is apparently the subject of a technical service bulletin. Just waiting for a part to come in but in the meantime it is okay to drive. I guess I'll have to content myself with "N" mode for awhile. Life can be so difficult. 😝

Does this problem sound familiar to anyone?
 

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Here's an update:

Took it to the dealer (Dave Smith in Coeur d'Alene, ID; great outfit that I can highly recommend, and lucky to have Thomas as the service technician - he knows his stuff!) this week. He diagnosed the issue as a faulty crankcase pressure sensor, which is apparently the subject of a technical service bulletin. Just waiting for a part to come in but in the meantime it is okay to drive. I guess I'll have to content myself with "N" mode for awhile. Life can be so difficult. 😝

Does this problem sound familiar to anyone?
Sounds very familiar! Driving to work today and check engine light comes on. Car is running completely normally. Took it in and they told me the error code pointed to the body control module (BCM) and that the solution was to change the crankcase pressure sensor. Interesting. Said they did the same thing to another quad recently which solved the problem.
 

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Okay so small update: the code that the car threw was P2C33. They had the car in for service on Tuesday to replace the crankcase pressure sensor. I get a call a few hours later saying "the tech found that your car does not have a crankcase pressure sensor, it is actually capped off (I don't know what that means), so they reset everything, test drove the car several times, the check engine light did not come back on, the car is running normally." I pick the car up on Tuesday night, everything is great, CEL comes back on today (Thursday). Car is still running completely normally. I plug my OBD and find the same code: P2C33. They told me to bring it back in so they can run further tests :🤷: Car has 4,800 miles on it and is approx. 3 months old.
 

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Here's an update:

Took it to the dealer (Dave Smith in Coeur d'Alene, ID; great outfit that I can highly recommend, and lucky to have Thomas as the service technician - he knows his stuff!) this week. He diagnosed the issue as a faulty crankcase pressure sensor, which is apparently the subject of a technical service bulletin. Just waiting for a part to come in but in the meantime it is okay to drive. I guess I'll have to content myself with "N" mode for awhile. Life can be so difficult. 😝

Does this problem sound familiar to anyone?
Hi..yes.. I recently bought a used 2018 Stelvio..and it had the engine light on..I hooked up OBD II scanner and it gave a P051B code. crankcase pressure sensor. I brought my car to the local Alfa dealer (on Stevens Creek in San Jose, CA) and they fixed it in a few days..for free (warranty work) and they gave me a 2021 Giulia as a loaner to get home and to drive back when car was ready.. now I can use all 3 drive modes! yay
 

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@Franiacob , I just saw this, your story is kinda strange....

P2C33 is more than a crankcase pressure sensor code. It means the Powertrain Control Module has detected the crankcase pressure sensor is out of range or faulty. Could be a problem in the connection, could be a problem with the PCM, could be a few things... Besides the crankcase sensor.

I would go to a different service center if possible for further diagnosis though. There are several things from your story that aren't right, and in the least that tech sounds like he has never touched a Stelvio before, might not know any more than you. If that isn't a possibility, at least contact Alfacare and try to get factory involvement in the diagnosis.
 

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@ALFAOFFROAD
My story is stranger than fiction but I attached the service department record. They essentially told me that they reset everything and all was good.

About 2 days later the code came back. There are actually two codes (P2C33 and P2C34). I brought the car back yesterday and they opened a STAR case. Just waiting on an update to see what’s going on. For the time being I’m driving a very nice 2022 Stelvio Veloce.
 

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That it truly strange. Glad they opened a star case, please keep us informed with the outcome.

Particularly interested in the sensor being capped off. You bought the car used....from an Alfa dealer?

Really interested in how they deal with the missing sensor. Hard to believe that isn't the issue.
 

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I'm sorry, I confused posts!!

Brand New 2021. That makes alot of sense now. This will hopefully be easy.

Here is how I would handle it.

Assume that due to supply shortages Alfa decided to ship the Car without a crankcase pressure sensor. And that is 100% what the problem is. When going to the dealer I would tell them exactly that.


They need to remove the cap from where the sensor should be, but isn't..and install a sensor. If by "capped" they mean the connector is missing too, ok. That's not hard. Install a connector too.

Freaking duh.

IMO....this type of thing is going to be common across brands until the supply chain issues change. Which may be a few years...like enough years it may become a decade.

(Especially since Texas politicians are using shipping containers to re-enforce thier border wall.... during a global shortage of shipping containers. Making disasters worse for the average person seems to be a political goal now. At least it's bi-partisan..both sides are screwing things up pretty well. So that's something?)
 

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@ALFAOFFROAD
I’ll admit I’m super intrigued by your theory…
HOWEVER
Why would it throw zero codes for the first 4500 miles!?!? That’s the only part I don’t get!!!!!
 

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Guess?

They did something in the software to make it not matter. The something worked when the engine was absolutely brand new (like the conditions the software engineers would have had), but once the engine breaks in, something changes and the "fix" doesn't work. Which is pretty normal in tech stuff.


This type of thing is a common running change made for lots of reasons (it's why if you look up parts sometimes you'll see 3 or 4 different part numbers for the same year vehicle, the same part, generally with a list of stipulations that help to figure out which part is for the specific car you are working on), but normally it's a mechanical piece, this has been done for almost 100 years is a basically business as usual, it rarely causes an issue.

Doing it with sensors and software is new though and very different. From what I'm reading in technical trade mags.....thanks to the supply issues in 2021, it has become a normal practice to re-engineer the software for small runs of vehicles due to missing sensors and such.

I'de ask for the sensor to be installed and the software reflashed.
 

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Do I have an update? I can only laugh right now. A simple sensor malfunction has made my car eligible for manufacturer reacquisition (i.e. Lemon Law).

Here's what happened. My car has been in service for 62 consecutive days for this problem. In that time, I've gone through 3 different loaners (a 22 Stelvio Veloce, a 22 Stelvio Ti, and now a 22 Giulia Veloce). I'm supposed to pick the car up tomorrow. I will say that Alfa is doing interesting things for me to avoid Lemoning the car...

TL/DR: The PCM needed to be replaced. Hopefully this will help someone avoid my ordeal.

If you want the long version, read below:
I brought the car in for a P3C33/34 code. The car was running perfectly; I got the CEL on the way to work one day, totally uneventful drive. I take the car in, and the dealership tells me it needs a new crankcase pressure sensor. They use the shop manual to locate the sensor but there isn't one. They contact STAR, who tell them to contact Italy Engineering because they (STAR) doesn't know where the sensor is (yikes). The team in Italy takes 10 days (no exaggeration) to respond. Apparently for 2021+ models, the location of the sensor has been changed, but the manuals have not been updated yet (keep in mind its 2022 already, so this is mindblowing to me). They find the sensor, replace, it, test drive, CEL comes back.

STAR asks them to check various wiring. But the wiring diagram they have has also not been updated (completely serious). 10 more days for Italy to respond. Wiring checks out OK. Back to Italy Engineering...another 10 days (I'm completely serious and not exaggerating). Italy team takes an ADDITIONAL 10 days to respond with a wiring diagram. Wiring checked, everything is OK. Car still throws the same CEL.

Back to STAR team, they don't have any answers, so they kick it back to Italy...10 more days. Finally they fly some dude in to look at the car, apparently he spent about 3h with the dealership techs, and the conclusion...replace the PCM. PCM replaced, so far no CEL, dealership says they'll let the car sit over the weekend, test drive again on Monday, and if all is good, I can pick up the car.

Some interesting side notes: Alfa Cares has offered a generous (in my opinion) reimbursement, I've had loaners (brand new ones) the entire way through, and they are offering other incentives for me to keep the car which, if they work out, I would consider generous and fair.

My personal thoughts:
On a side note I'm Italian. My parents were born in Italy. I spent years of my childhood there. I speak Italian, my kids speak Italian, etc. etc. I'm very familiar with the culture and its "charming inefficiencies." I'm also not new to Alfa. My grandmother up until recently was driving a 145. My father has had Milanos (155s), 164s, GTVs, GTV6s, Duettos, and so on. We even had an Alfetta at one point. My family has had a total of 16 (sixteen) Alfas. I have good friends that commute from our town in Italy and actually work at the Cassino factory building Stelvios. That said, if you're buying an alfa like having a girlfriend on the side, Salute! If this is your main squeeze, "ahia" as they say in Italian.
 

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When they keep you in a car and offer a reimbursement for your trouble there's not much to complain about. I'm not surprized with extra factory/parts difficulties these days.
I had an issue a bit like this in my early quad within 500 miles - they took care of me, and years later I couldn't be happier with the car.
And its not my "on the side car", it gets used and treated like a car.
 

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My car has been in service for 62 consecutive days
Wow!

It would have been faster to send the car back to Cassino to be diagnosed and repaired. 10 days to Italy, 10 days at the factory, and 10 days back across the Atlantic.

I wonder how long it will take to update the shop manuals. That is a new hazard for owners of recent model year Stelvios.
 
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