Alfa Romeo Stelvio Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I've been looking at Stelvios for a couple of days. It seems hard to find the combination i'd want, but i'm wondering if any 19 inch owners would have an interest in swapping their wheels for the 20s on my potential purchase?
Thanks,

Alejandro
 

·
Premium Member
2018 Stelvio Base 20" yellow calipers
Joined
·
1,504 Posts
Alejandro- can you say where you are located geographically? One dealer in our zone has a great selection with the 19's and a dealer search should find exactly what you are wanting. Curious why: is it the run flats on the 19" wheels or just the appearance? We actually wanted the 20" wheels and avoided the run flats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Alejandro- can you say where you are located geographically? One dealer in our zone has a great selection with the 19's and a dealer search should find exactly what you are wanting. Curious why: is it the run flats on the 19" wheels or just the appearance? We actually wanted the 20" wheels and avoided the run flats.
I'm in NC. However it seems the car i was looking has sold, so back to the drawing board :)
It's the appearance, they scream AR whereas the 20s do not, at least to me. My ideal car would be Vesuvio Gray, red/black interior, sport package, weather package (or a TI), 19" wheels. That said i didn't realize they came with run flats which i generally dislike. So 20's are non runflats, and i imagine the car then comes with a pump and repair kit?
Other nice to have items would be dynamic assist pkg and pano roof, but we can live w/o them
Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
348 Posts
I love the 20s, they look awesome, but in my ignorance, I did not know about the whole " no spare tire, here is your compressor and slime deal"...or the no oil dipstick situation (different thread). Others are used to this with European cars, but frankly I have only owned Japanese and US vehicles....primarily trucks. Always had at least doughnut spares.

I have only had one flat on the highway, only 4-wheeling (not happening with the Alfa). Hope my luck continues.

Keep your 20s!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I love the 20s, they look awesome, but in my ignorance, I did not know about the whole " no spare tire, here is your compressor and slime deal"...or the no oil dipstick situation (different thread). Others are used to this with European cars, but frankly I have only owned Japanese and US vehicles....primarily trucks. Always had at least doughnut spares.

I have only had one flat on the highway, only 4-wheeling (not happening with the Alfa). Hope my luck continues.

Keep your 20s!!
Oh no dipstick? BMW did that and realized the error of their ways, like 5 years ago lol. Digital read out then on the Stelvio?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
399 Posts
I'm in NC. However it seems the car i was looking has sold, so back to the drawing board :)
It's the appearance, they scream AR whereas the 20s do not, at least to me. My ideal car would be Vesuvio Gray, red/black interior, sport package, weather package (or a TI), 19" wheels. That said i didn't realize they came with run flats which i generally dislike. So 20's are non runflats, and i imagine the car then comes with a pump and repair kit?
Other nice to have items would be dynamic assist pkg and pano roof, but we can live w/o them
Thanks!
Having driven a Sport with 19's a few hundred miles over several days, and just over 3k miles in my Ti Sport with 20's, I can tell an improvement in handling with the 20, as well as a decrease in comfort (which to me is a fair trade, others may feel differently). the larger sidewalls on the 19's (and ESPICIALLY on the 18's) negatively impact the cornering of the car, while simultaneously improving the ride quality. Pick your personal preference and enjoy!

Oh no dipstick? BMW did that and realized the error of their ways, like 5 years ago lol. Digital read out then on the Stelvio?
yes digital readout on the dash. It seems this is going to be the standard soon on high boost engines / modern EPA rule engines, particularly on direct injection motors. I believe (but could be wrong) that the dipstick removal allows for higher crankcase pressures (that would pop a normal dipstick out of the tube) which reduces piston ring blow-by, therefore reducing the amount of recirculation into the intake done by the PCV valve. That blow-by crankcase ventilation recirculation is the primary (almost exclusive) source of carbonization of the intake valves on direct injection engines. The theory is that this should help reduce long term maintenance, but I don't think it's been tested in the real world long enough to see if it really helps or is just a placebo.

at least they didn't go the way that Jag (among others) did and eliminate the oil pan drain plug, and require the oil to be sucked out with a vacuum extractor. It's easy to do, but you then don't drain the sludge at the bottom which contains any metal or particulates, you suck out the top of the oil and pour new oil in on top of the leftover at the bottom, allowing those particulates and metal shavings to potentially circulate through the engine again and cause additional wear.
 
  • Like
Reactions: integrale

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Having driven a Sport with 19's a few hundred miles over several days, and just over 3k miles in my Ti Sport with 20's, I can tell an improvement in handling with the 20, as well as a decrease in comfort (which to me is a fair trade, others may feel differently). the larger sidewalls on the 19's (and ESPICIALLY on the 18's) negatively impact the cornering of the car, while simultaneously improving the ride quality. Pick your personal preference and enjoy!
It's more about style, the 19s scream AR! ;)
Plus i don't want my wife's SUV to have the same profile tyres as my Miata's, this is supposed to be the practical car lol

yes digital readout on the dash. It seems this is going to be the standard soon on high boost engines / modern EPA rule engines, particularly on direct injection motors. I believe (but could be wrong) that the dipstick removal allows for higher crankcase pressures (that would pop a normal dipstick out of the tube) which reduces piston ring blow-by, therefore reducing the amount of recirculation into the intake done by the PCV valve. That blow-by crankcase ventilation recirculation is the primary (almost exclusive) source of carbonization of the intake valves on direct injection engines. The theory is that this should help reduce long term maintenance, but I don't think it's been tested in the real world long enough to see if it really helps or is just a placebo.
That's odd, it means they would have to have some pretty heavy and fuel inefficient seals to deal with a pressure capable of popping something with such as tiny surface area as a dipstick. Do your RMS every 10k mi lol! And there's still EGR to deal with in such a solution.
A lot of manufacturers are simply doing a dual direct/port injection system instead. Heck even a catch can would be a better solution

at least they didn't go the way that Jag (among others) did and eliminate the oil pan drain plug, and require the oil to be sucked out with a vacuum extractor. It's easy to do, but you then don't drain the sludge at the bottom which contains any metal or particulates, you suck out the top of the oil and pour new oil in on top of the leftover at the bottom, allowing those particulates and metal shavings to potentially circulate through the engine again and cause additional wear.
Agree with you. I know a lot of folks who like doing their oil that way. I like the speed of the flow achieved by using the drain plug.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
399 Posts
That's odd, it means they would have to have some pretty heavy and fuel inefficient seals to deal with a pressure capable of popping something with such as tiny surface area as a dipstick. Do your RMS every 10k mi lol! And there's still EGR to deal with in such a solution.
A lot of manufacturers are simply doing a dual direct/port injection system instead. Heck even a catch can would be a better solution
Actually even with good piston ring seals, when your turbo pumps 22+ PSI of boost, you're bound to get blowby. :wink With any DI engine you need to minimize that blowby as much as possible. Catch cans can help, but they require frequent checking and draining to maintain their effectiveness. They also only help maybe 50% of the problem?

EGR won't clean the intake valves, it's purely an emissions control system, and can actually make the intake carbonization worse.

The dual direct and port injection solution is the ONLY 100% true solution to keeping the intake valves from getting carbonized. unfortunately I don't know if it's very common yet, the only company I've yet heard is doing it is Toyota (though there could be more).

As for having enough pressure to pop the dip stick, it used to be a common thing to see on higher compression / higher mileage engines as they age and start to loose power when they first started putting the o-ring dipstick seals in. Remember my mom's 120k mi ~94 Buick with a 3.8L started to pop the dipstick tube if you really laid on the pedal for a while on the interstate onramp. That's when we knew it was time to get rid of it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Actually even with good piston ring seals, when your turbo pumps 22+ PSI of boost, you're bound to get blowby. :wink With any DI engine you need to minimize that blowby as much as possible. Catch cans can help, but they require frequent checking and draining to maintain their effectiveness. They also only help maybe 50% of the problem?

EGR won't clean the intake valves, it's purely an emissions control system, and can actually make the intake carbonization worse.

The dual direct and port injection solution is the ONLY 100% true solution to keeping the intake valves from getting carbonized. unfortunately I don't know if it's very common yet, the only company I've yet heard is doing it is Toyota (though there could be more).

As for having enough pressure to pop the dip stick, it used to be a common thing to see on higher compression / higher mileage engines as they age and start to loose power when they first started putting the o-ring dipstick seals in. Remember my mom's 120k mi ~94 Buick with a 3.8L started to pop the dipstick tube if you really laid on the pedal for a while on the interstate onramp. That's when we knew it was time to get rid of it!
I'm not talking about piston rings, but the actual engine seals, very different ;)
All cars get blowby, why you need the PCV. No EGR won't clean, rather the opposite
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
It's more about style, the 19s scream AR! ;)
Agree, I like the style of the 19's better too but I'm getting a TI Sport most likely with the 20's. Wish they made a 20 inch version of those I just like the look of the painted calipers on the round hole wheels . I was on the fence about special ordering the 19's on the TI sport but now based on another poster's description of the ride and handling (I only test drove the TI sport with 20's) I will stick with the 20's I guess. Maybe Alfa will offer more wheel choices in the future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
534 Posts
It's still a relatively new vehicle and the aftermarket is still catching up.
Case point, I bought the AR55 18" wheels for my winter set only 2 months ago and already they show a new 19" wheel for the Stelvio. Hopefully soon companies like this will be making a 20" and 21" wheel.

Link to RWC wheels:
Collection roues
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Hi all,

I've been looking at Stelvios for a couple of days. It seems hard to find the combination i'd want, but i'm wondering if any 19 inch owners would have an interest in swapping their wheels for the 20s on my potential purchase?
Thanks,

Alejandro
I had the same issue as you. The 19" "hole" wheel looks like an Alfa. I have the 20" but lust for the wheels on the Quadrifoglio. Alfa is holding back on us.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top