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Discussion Starter #1
OK, before y'all tell me there already is a thread (or multiple threads) on this subject, hear me out...

I am curious as to why, if there are lowering kits and springs available for the Stelvio Quadrifoglio, why is that no one offers lowering kits/springs fo r the Stelvio 2.0 with the Electronic (active/adaptive) suspension?
From what I can tell, the QF/QV has this type of suspension, there is even a Quadrifoglio aftermarket kit that replaces both shocks and spring that plugs into the existing Alfa suspension electronics.

Conversely, every Stelvio 2.0 discussion I can find and every lowering spring kit I see that is available for the 2.0, explicitly says not for vehicles with the optional active/adaptive suspension.

It's mystifying. Does anyone have any insights or, better yet, has anyone fitted lowering springs on a 2.0 with the electronic suspension, without issues?

I, for one, would love to lower my Stelvio 2.0 Ti Sport a bit. I really don't like that big gap.
 

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Been trying to figure that out for two years and have asked Madness a couple times...
It should be the same system, but I’d like confirmation.
 

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Is there an aftermarket QV coil over system I don’t know about??
seconded. (Feels like we are treading on threadjackery...)

I’d talk to the alfissimo guy, matt at Alfa9supply, EuroCompulsion and madness autowerks; see what they say.

spring Rates from the H&r, eibach or madness qv parts likely won’t play nicely with your adaptively dampered ti, due to differences in vehicle weight, weight balance and dampers. (I don’t know the dampers part for a fact. The weight bit I’m willing to say is fact-like ;))
 

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maybe its a cost thing? they figured the market would be bigger on the QF and put money into developing it for that vs the regular stelvio?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
seconded. (Feels like we are treading on threadjackery...)

I’d talk to the alfissimo guy, matt at Alfa9supply, EuroCompulsion and madness autowerks; see what they say.

spring Rates from the H&r, eibach or madness qv parts likely won’t play nicely with your adaptively dampered ti, due to differences in vehicle weight, weight balance and dampers. (I don’t know the dampers part for a fact. The weight bit I’m willing to say is fact-like ;))
So, about the spring rates... There are lowering springs for the non-QV Stelvios fromH&R etc. The only thing is they all say, not for active suspension Stelvio but shouldn't these spring rates be designed for the weight, balance, and dampers of the non-QV Stelvio. The active suspension should be similarly modulated, the main difference being, the sensors, and electronic brain changing the damping ration based on the setting. So, this still does not make a lot of sense to me.
 

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Yeah, pushing the suspension button only alters the damping, the springs are the same.
So whether you have it or not, giulia or stelvio, the factory figured what they thought was optimal, and a stiffer spring might be under damped. Of course no one who has swapped thinks that, so not severe.
Maybe with the active on hard it will be closer to right, and on soft much farther from optimal. Is either any worse than fixed damping which is somewhere between the two settings?
Stock assumes a certain load in the vehicle, a certain "level" of driving, and certain road conditions. So it's not "right" all the time anyway.
 

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So, about the spring rates... There are lowering springs for the non-QV Stelvios fromH&R etc. The only thing is they all say, not for active suspension Stelvio but shouldn't these spring rates be designed for the weight, balance, and dampers of the non-QV Stelvio. The active suspension should be similarly modulated, the main difference being, the sensors, and electronic brain changing the damping ration based on the setting. So, this still does not make a lot of sense to me.

I looked into this.. and I have adaptive on my 2.0 stelvio.. the reason its not suggested is because lowering it makes the adjustable shocks slightly preloaded which wears them prematurely and at 750 a piece its not good.. the lower you go the more they are prone to prematurely wear.. However, truth be told and this also been said on BMW forums, that you will still get like 80% life out of them so they should be fine with lowering job for 75k miles maybe more.. In other words, its a non issue if you keep it conservative.. Ive noticed the adaptive US models sit very high in the rear and the Euro and non adaptive do not..maybe its to add comfort to the US model or for towing usage against the adaptive system.. I think its worse for handling so the aftermarket height and spring rates should be just fine if they are well matched to the car in general like the Madness I believe... I looked into Euro model springs for the active sus, but part numbers and ordering it has been a total pain in the ass to figure out not to mention no guarantee of height difference. I personally think Madness has great springs as does Eurcompulsion and Vogtland I believe. I think they all use the same manufacturer however (perhaps vogtland) as they have the same Linear spring up front and Linear/Progressive spring set up in the back.. Im not sure how the handling is, or if I even like that setup.. Id personally prefer to have my OEM springs professionally cut by 1.25inches to keep things closest to OEM but thats a whole different path, im not gonna do.. Just know if you do get the more conservative lowering kit from Madness which was what I was going to do, you need the dealer or an ALFA shop to do it as the top of the spring perch has the adaptive connector and there is a special tool to undo it, also you have to take apart a lot more of the suspension to remove the spring because of the adaptive system.. so go somewhere qualified and good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I looked into this.. and I have adaptive on my 2.0 stelvio.. the reason its not suggested is because lowering it makes the adjustable shocks slightly preloaded which wears them prematurely and at 750 a piece its not good.. the lower you go the more they are prone to prematurely wear.. However, truth be told and this also been said on BMW forums, that you will still get like 80% life out of them so they should be fine with lowering job for 75k miles maybe more.. In other words, its a non issue if you keep it conservative.. Ive noticed the adaptive US models sit very high in the rear and the Euro and non adaptive do not..maybe its to add comfort to the US model or for towing usage against the adaptive system.. I think its worse for handling so the aftermarket height and spring rates should be just fine if they are well matched to the car in general like the Madness I believe... I looked into Euro model springs for the active sus, but part numbers and ordering it has been a total pain in the ass to figure out not to mention no guarantee of height difference. I personally think Madness has great springs as does Eurcompulsion and Vogtland I believe. I think they all use the same manufacturer however (perhaps vogtland) as they have the same Linear spring up front and Linear/Progressive spring set up in the back.. Im not sure how the handling is, or if I even like that setup.. Id personally prefer to have my OEM springs professionally cut by 1.25inches to keep things closest to OEM but thats a whole different path, im not gonna do.. Just know if you do get the more conservative lowering kit from Madness which was what I was going to do, you need the dealer or an ALFA shop to do it as the top of the spring perch has the adaptive connector and there is a special tool to undo it, also you have to take apart a lot more of the suspension to remove the spring because of the adaptive system.. so go somewhere qualified and good luck
Thank you for the answer Rambino, As my Stelvio is under the CPO Warranty, I may not go with the lowering, especially if I can't install/uninstall the springs myself.? Still considering it tho... :devilish:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
There is a button in the center of the dna dial that has an image of a damping strut. If you have the button, you have adaptive suspension.
 

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Cutting your springs does crazy things to spring rates. Are you cutting progressive portion or load portion ie top or bottom. You may be shocked at different result you get from either end
 

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Cutting your springs does crazy things to spring rates. Are you cutting progressive portion or load portion ie top or bottom. You may be shocked at different result you get from either end
The Stelvio is Linear Front and Rear from the factory, so cutting them professionally (if the perch spring types is correct, only certain springs can be cut), would add a litter more spring load but it would still have the factory balance and overall linear rates.. But yes, cutting a progressive spring would def be an issue and make the ride super stiff and not good..The aftermarket kits use a combo Linear/Progressive spring for the rear.. Not sure why and they all do it which let me to believe it comes from the same manufacturer..

I dont plan to cut my springs..I would go the Madness route personally but instead I installed the Front and Rear Quad sway bars, so my overall handling is very tight now and satisfactory enough for me.

The front bar in the USA now carries the same part number for the Base and Quad: US Part Number 68366706AA which is the smaller Base bar so you cannot order the thicker one from a US dealer, however the Quad models from the factory come with a 1.5mm thicker bar and have a different part number in the Euro parts catalog: Manufacturer Part Number is: 00505417810 .. There is no US part number for this, but you may find some on ebay or other salvage yard websites.

I checked the measurments on the front Quad one I got and mine is indeed around 1.5mm thicker which translates to 20% additional stiffness after some math and research. The rear sway can be ordered at the dealer and makes a huge difference, no additional parts besides the bar are needed either. The rear thicker Quad bar you can just order from a dealer or Mopar parts online US part number: 68406134AA.. Just give them a random Quad Vin to verify: ZASPAKEVXK7C43442

The rear install is ANNOYING. Its very simple, but there is a bolt on each bracket which can only be removed by taking a T45 socket bit, popping the bit out.. Putting that bit in the bolt hole and then use a very small wrench and slowly loosen it.. Took me a couple hours for the whole install., Not difficult or hard to reach, but requires a lot of feel only, as those bolts dont have much visual on them. A lift is extra handy. The other 2 bracket bolts come out easily with a T45 Alan Wrench...

The front bar easily pops in, however you need to remove the 2 front steering rack bolts to allow the bar to slide in and out.. took about 1 hour.

Overall the handling is much more sportier.. you will lose some comfort taking turns around town as it can be a tad stiff, but highway and curves are an absolutle blast now.. I decided to keep my OEM Springs as these upgrades were simple bolt ons and made me content with the high ride height..
 

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Yea I also installed the Race mode DNA controller from the Quad (there are a lot of threads on this, install is fairly straightforward and takes about 45min).. I coded the car using the Multiscanecu program and got the cables from Alfissimo. I did some research on what to change to make the controller work. For the Stelvios its just Byte 88 in the proxi code (there are threads on this as well).. It activates the race mode on the controller which pops up on the screen, makes the shifts faster, makes the downshifts more agressive, I think it makes the torqure percentage front to rear more rear, and on adaptive cars its gives an extra stiff Race suspension setting which makes the handling even tighter with the sway bars, and also turns the ESC and Crash Protection warning OFF just like the Quad.
 

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I agree, too bad its such a pain in the ass to do though lol, installing the controller, installing the sgw bypass module on mid 2018+ models, getting the cables, getting the multiscanecu program, then figuring out the coding and process to activate the controller etc... its more for those who are really looking for that extra touch and have a lot of time on their hands to research and sort it all out.. Was worth it to me because of my additional adapative suspension mode, but I spent many hours to get it done right
 

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I guess it's easier for those with standard suspension, dont run into that one end soft the other hard situation.
And the more of you guys that do it and post about what you ran into and solutions, the easier for the next guy.
 

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I think what your refering to is the Adaptice suspension being Stiffer in the rear but soft in the front.. This is only the case for the Gulias that add race mode.. On the Stelvio, the Front and Rear both become stiffer and do not need any additional programming outside what the base non-adaptive models do.. Just change the one byte to 88 in the proxi and you get all the benefits..
 

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Yes. That's it.
Glad to hear stelvio guys have it better than the giulia guys haha.
I only read these things, no experience as I decided to spring for it when ordering. Expensive factory option, but included bigger engine, wheels etc so not too bad.
 
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