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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Took delivery of my 2020 Stelvio Quadrifoglio today and absolutely love it so far. Amazed at the change in character between the various DNA settings. Have only been able to get a taste of race but it's great.

I traded my Porsche Macan S for a little Italian flavor. It was a great choice....

But I noticed that my touchscreen doesn't respond to inputs. Has anyone had this happen before? After restarting the touchscreen nothing happened. Software update? (Sigh).

There a few scant threads on here about attaching battery tenders - nothing too deep about using a quick connect. Anyone done this with a CTEK so you don't have to use clamps under the hood?

Many thanks in advance!
 

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I am a believer in the CTEK. I do my QV, 4C and wife's SL once a month until the green light comes on. I use the little clamps with the CTEK in the engine compartment. I tried the permanent CTEK connection on the 4C but it corroded quickly and I went back to clamps.
 

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The few times I used mine I let the boot lid shut over the wire leaving the unit outside (reduces fire hazard). I saw no damage to the wire or the seals.

There really is little need for the ctek unless you are leaving the car unused for well over 4 weeks provided it has no parasitic drains. If it does have problems, they should be traced and fixed. Ctek regular use will only mask the problem that may leave you stranded away from home.

Cheap generic BT monitor is the first thing to fit to the Stelvio. Also goes on the battery posts. Takes 15min including app set up. You can then gain comfort from the battery cycling looking at the history or confirm the car has a problem.

It will be coming to a year since I last used my ctek and that was only to run a conditioning cycle. I used it several times early on just to compare how well the car manages to charge the battery. I tested long idle discharge runs in lockdowns and I am comfortable 4 weeks is very easy from fully topped up battery. I had no issues leaving the car over two weeks in the airport and the battery was still showing very decent voltage.
I have sporadic Stelvio use - 2-3 1mile school runs per week with some 5-10 mile B road trips on weekends - not exactly battery friendly, but it cycles absolutely fine. I am StopStart disabled by default but when I turned it on in motorway traffic the other day it worked fine. Keyless entry has no impact. Keys in faraday box or out has no impact. Leaving car doors open for a while does have impact, but no one will do that on purpose.

I did have the car randomly try to drain the battery on me after my first long trip whilst on holiday. luckily I was in bt range, the monitor app notified me an hour after I unloaded the car that the battery was critical (the chart was just showing this scary voltage drop - some consumer was on), I went for a 10 mile drive to recharge, then watched the app like a hawk for the rest of the day and regularly for the rest of the holiday but it never happened again. Whilst it had me worried it never repeated so I wrote it off to some random firmware glitch. Ctek would not have helped me here.
I get updates of battery voltage whenever I’m in bt range and a daily notification of battery status. I casually note the percentage (it’s meaningless other than to show battery is not in danger) and dismiss it. I occasionally check the history to see battery still cycles to good voltage after long trips.
I have had a short range electric car for the last 7 years which I need to plug in 2-3 times a week. It’s a small hassle but at least it replaces fuel stops. I would hate the nuisance of constantly hanging a ctek off the back of my Stelvio just in case.
 

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Location of jump connectors on our Alfas is so easy, I didn't even bother with quick connects because, well, its no quicker.
 

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‘22 Stelvio QV
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242 Posts
So to summarize, you can
A) drive more often,
B) charge via the jump terminals
C) hardwire a pigtail to battery
  1. Run the cable out of the rear hatch
  2. Run the cable thru the rear window
D) and if you forget to do any of the above, call a tow truck.
 

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My 2019 TI has sat as long as 16 days without a battery issue and is still on its original AGM battery. I load tested it last month and it is at 110% of rated capacity. One of the keys is to lock the doors to put the system to sleep. Even in your home garage lock the doors (you can leave windows down) this puts the system to sleep so it doesnt keep checking for activity at certain intervals. I learned this on my Mini Coopers also. All cars with a Can Bus system
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks everyone for your responses.

I took it into my local dealer (great experience so far) and apparently an AGM came with my 2020 version. I was surprised to hear that but also happy to not have to replace the battery.

While it was there I had them attach the quick connect with 3/8" M8 eyelets for the CTEK charger. Really only plan on using it while I'm gone for extended periods of time.

The dysfunctional touchscreen is going to be replaced.

The QV is so fun to drive that I'll let that slide.
 

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2018 Stelvio Quad
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78 Posts
I run an extension from the garage, though the rear door and rest it in the boot, connect the charger into the pigtail and plug into extension socket and just slowly push rear door shut with cable at bottom of rear door.
I just run my pig tail from the jump connections under the hood and extend it slightly near the windshield wipers on the passenger side. There is a small gap in the gasket/seal right there and it doesn't interfere with the sealing of the hood. I use a battery tender and the pig tail includes a cap.. So just uncap it and plug it in.
 
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