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I've used Racechip GTS in my previous Volvo, V90 T6. While it didn't make the advertised HP gains, it made a noticeable difference, I would say 60-70% of the HP advertised. Other than that, I liked the ability to change maps from the phone, warm up timer and that I didn't have to physically remove it when doing emissions tests.
 

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I've used Racechip GTS in my previous Volvo, V90 T6. While it didn't make the advertised HP gains, it made a noticeable difference, I would say 60-70% of the HP advertised. Other than that, I liked the ability to change maps from the phone, warm up timer and that I didn't have to physically remove it when doing emissions tests.
Thanks for your response. Have you considered it for your 2020 Quad? If not, why not?
 

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Yes, I have considered it but I'm also reading and learning about other alternatives. I'm not in a rush to get it done, I'm thinking by the Spring since we're about to enter the winter/snow season in Chicago. I know I don't want to take the ECUs out and I also know I don't want to deactivate engine start/stop function...I might one of the few that actually likes that function...I just learned about the Ideal Race tune that only defaults it to Off position, which is nice.

I had the Racechip (RC) in the Volvo for 40k miles, so I trust that device. I'm also curious about JB4...but don't like the idea of punching a hole and having the OBDII port being utilized all the time, besides, it would make it difficult to hide/uninstall for those time I need to take the car for service or warranty repair.

I too am curious what others think about the Ideal Race option...and if anyone else has used RC in the QV.
 

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Yes, I have considered it but I'm also reading and learning about other alternatives. I'm not in a rush to get it done, I'm thinking by the Spring since we're about to enter the winter/snow season in Chicago. I know I don't want to take the ECUs out and I also know I don't want to deactivate engine start/stop function...I might one of the few that actually likes that function...I just learned about the Ideal Race tune that only defaults it to Off position, which is nice.

I had the Racechip (RC) in the Volvo for 40k miles, so I trust that device. I'm also curious about JB4...but don't like the idea of punching a hole and having the OBDII port being utilized all the time, besides, it would make it difficult to hide/uninstall for those time I need to take the car for service or warranty repair.

I too am curious what others think about the Ideal Race option...and if anyone else has used RC in the QV.
Looks like we're in the same boat, Pocholin.
 

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I ended up going with Ideal and love it. Butt dyno says gains are there. ECU removal wasn't bad and turnaround was 1 day.
Were you able to do the installation yourself?
 

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I see from another post that you've installed the Racechip GTS in your QV. Do you have any comments yet?
Thanks for noticing, pocholin!

My wife made the chipping selection for me when she presented me with the RaceChip GTS Black for Christmas. Being reluctant to test my limited skills as an automotive tech, especially on such an intimidating engine, I took my time with the installation, consulting both RaceChip (who were very helpful) and my local Alfa tech, with whom I had been discussing the idealrace offering. I understand that idealrace reprograms the car's ECU (which needs to be removed and then replaced) while RaceChip supplements the stock system. Hence the addition of the RaceChip is obvious upon looking under the hood whereas the idealrace modification is unnoticeable. I'm sure that each has their advantages and disadvantages.

In retrospect (and now that I know what I'm doing) the RaceChip installation wasn't too bad. I could do it in probably a quarter of the time now - maybe a couple hours. It would be an easy removal if that were necessary - some service departments and perhaps government authorities might take issue with it (RaceChip warns that their product is not legal for road use in some jurisdictions) - but that may be the only drawback. My Alfa tech is fine with it and is curious about its performance as he is only familiar with the idealrace option. For what it's worth, RaceChip is about half the price, which pretty much dictated my wife's selection. :)

All systems seem to work as they should. I can use the phone app to adjust the settings (which can also be manually adjusted on the ECU), set a timer so that the engine is properly warmed up before RaceChip is activated, and can turn it off altogether to return to stock settings (which should be good for comparisons). And speaking of settings, the RaceChip has seven of them which apparently augment each of the QV's four driving modes, theoretically giving me 28 options per my communications with RaceChip. I know this must all be redundant information for you since you have installed RaceChip in another vehicle but I wanted to review it for other curious readers.

I would LOVE to offer a performance report but the roads here in eastern WA have been covered with snow and ice, and the hours of daylight are severely limited so road hazards ( e.g,. whitetail deer) are not always obvious. But you can bet that on the first suitable day I'll be out for initial testing!
 

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Well, nice write up for other to know what to expect. The biggest challenge is getting access to the sensors where Racechip needs to be plugged in, other than that it is an easy installation. I didn't always removed mine when taking my Volvo to the dealer for oil change and they never gave me a hard time...then again, the reason was maintenance not warranty, which might've changed their position about it. I always appreciated the phone connectivity to select the map...map1 for the least aggressive and map7 for the most aggressive.

I look forward to Spring or some time when you can really test and feel the difference, for now I would recommend putting it in map4 and see if that yields any better gas mileage under normal (not gunning it) usage, which was my experience with the Volvo.
 

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Well, nice write up for other to know what to expect. The biggest challenge is getting access to the sensors where Racechip needs to be plugged in, other than that it is an easy installation. I didn't always removed mine when taking my Volvo to the dealer for oil change and they never gave me a hard time...then again, the reason was maintenance not warranty, which might've changed their position about it. I always appreciated the phone connectivity to select the map...map1 for the least aggressive and map7 for the most aggressive.

I look forward to Spring or some time when you can really test and feel the difference, for now I would recommend putting it in map4 and see if that yields any better gas mileage under normal (not gunning it) usage, which was my experience with the Volvo.
Thanks for your kind words.

I agree that sensor access was the biggest challenge. Some were buried a bit with short cables and not easily manipulated. But the first challenge was ensuring that I was accessing the correct sensors and connecting them to the correct cables. Five sensors for a total of ten connections - a real octopus of a wiring harness, which was a challenge to route through the engine compartment. I breathed a sigh of relief when the car started, the dash lights came on and went off as they should, and the engine responded to the accelerator.

Thanks for reminding me about the claims of improved fuel mileage. That will be fun to observe over the next several tanks. What did you see with your Volvo? What size engine and how much horsepower and torque were you dealing with?
 

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Thanks for your kind words.

I agree that sensor access was the biggest challenge. Some were buried a bit with short cables and not easily manipulated. But the first challenge was ensuring that I was accessing the correct sensors and connecting them to the correct cables. Five sensors for a total of ten connections - a real octopus of a wiring harness, which was a challenge to route through the engine compartment. I breathed a sigh of relief when the car started, the dash lights came on and went off as they should, and the engine responded to the accelerator.

Thanks for reminding me about the claims of improved fuel mileage. That will be fun to observe over the next several tanks. What did you see with your Volvo? What size engine and how much horsepower and torque were you dealing with?
The V90, in the US, now only has a 4-cylinder 2.0 Litter engine, some with 250HP and others with 316HP. Mine had 316hp plus another 15 or so from the Polestar optimisation for a total of about 330HP. With Racechip on map7 my car was getting up to 370 HP according to Vitrual Dyno. If I use that as a reference, the car never did 330HP in map0 (effectively no Racechip), it only did 318HP. This is about 15% improvement, thus is "should" be almost 380HP (not bad for such a small engine).
Gas mileage: Only highway I could get 35-36 MPG driving it very conservative at 60 MPH; 30 MPG at 75 MPH. The best realistic combination was measured at the end of 4,500 mile road trip with the family and roof box at 25.5 MPG...my typical drive is 80-84 MPH when I have the roof box, so I was very happy with the efficiency.
However, I don't know how much better that is from its stock form since I installed Racechip only a month or two into the ownership of the Volvo.
 
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