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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, not going to do a full write up on replacing the plugs, the basics are covered. Just want to add a few tips and tricks, then discuss wear.

Tools needed: pick, a 10mm socket with a 3in extension, a 16mm or 5/8 deep socket or spark plug socket with a total of 9in extension. Also a magnetic bowl to hold bolts securely and an extendable magnet to grab any bolts that might fall, these arent nessesary, but can come in handy.
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Tip #1 electrical connectors.
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Use a pick to pull or push the grey levers. Push down while moving the lever. Push down on the grey lever also when removing and replacing the connector. The lever has a hook that clips to a plastic part on the coil pack to lock it in place. The plastic piece on the coil pack can break off if the connector is forced (or the hook on the lever can break, both bad) never yank or force anything when removing electrical connectors...or in general when working on a car.
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Besides the connector on the packs you will also want to remove one connector above the second cylinder (from the front) to make removal of the coil pack easy. Pull the red clip forward, then press down on the black lever in the middle of the red clip, and remove easily.
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2 Removing/replacing bolts and plugs.

When removing do not yank or hit. Use even constant pressure, start easy and increase the force you use slowly till something moves. Same thing when replacing the bolts/plugs. Tighten till snug, do not ever crank down as much as possible.

Also - very important - the plugs should thread back in very easy. If there is any resistance, before the very end, when turning: back them out and reinsert. DO NOT CROSS THREAD. This car has an aluminum head and it is easier to do then you might think. Do not use threadlock of any kind.

This is why I suggest these extension lengths. Last cylinder clearance.
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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
3 Removing the coil pack.

Pull off without bending at all possible..which it is, with all 4 cylinders. Also either do each cylinder independently, or be sure to mark which coil came from which cylinder. Putting coil pack from cylinder 1 on cylinder 2 isnt the biggest deal, but I have seen it impact performance/reliability.
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Again dont force. You do need to give a strong pull initially to get the boot to release from the plug but not hard. Same thing replacing, push down but don't slam. I also only.pit force in the hard plastic siding, I never press down in the center of the coil pack. The coil pack is a piece of elctronic equipment treat it like a computer part (that is a bit extreme, but safe).

It's a really easy job doesn't take much elbow grease at all.

Now to the good part.

First here is a link to Denso's chart on spark plug wear and what the various residues and wear patterns mean.


And pic of a new plug
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And one that came out of the engine at 29,995mi.
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Hehe...so there is definitly some heat wear and carbon build-up. No sign of Low-speed Pre-Ignition or other real problems like oil buildup, fouling, etc.

Why the heat and carbon though?

My guess is I don't warm the engine up long enough. The particular form of heat wear I have always understood to mean the electrode is firing at high temp before the body gets up to temp. Which could also cause increased carbon build-up, besides that the carbon is likely due to my tendency to drive at low engine speeds for long periods when going off road. The build-up isn't so much to be worrisome at all, but it is more than I would expect from a spark plug with 30k miles on it when the car is driven more "normally". (I did scope the engine and the carbon build-up internally is very minor. Very)

So what I'm changing for myself to keep the engine running well into the future, is to let the engine get fully up to temp before I goose the engine. As-is I wait till it is about halfway there (which feels like forever). Also to generally try to drive less agressivly in terms of how I apply power....that one probably won't really happen though.

This is the plug body. The yellow is considered to be a symptom of electrical stress. Probably from my habit of using as much of my horsepower as often as possible... hehe
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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Oh yeah....

And lastly, to clear the dash message telling you to get an oil change without a scanner.

Do not put your foot on the brake. Both feet flat on floor.

1) Press the start button and turn the car on without starting engine.

2) Fully press and depress the gas pedal 5 times. Do it slow you have about ten seconds to perform the process.. Press all the way down, then take your foot off at the top. 5 times.

Do not put your foot on the brake. Both feet flat on floor

3) Press the Start/Stop button again to shut the car off.

Now you can start it normally and the dash warning should be reset. The one in the infotainment requires a scanner.


@fast_dave ...can't find my gap tool. I'll grab another one if I cant find it in the next day or so. I have the plugs saved in a place they won't get damaged. Definitly want to check the gap. (Once I find the tool I will also check the gap on the new plugs to be safe...experiance tells me they will be fine though. I got the plugs from Alfissimo and they were packaged well with 0 damage to the boxes. Sure the factory gap is good, why I went ahead and put them in)

Will say given how much smoother it drives and noticably better acceleration above 75mph..really glad I changed them regardless of the gap variation.

Also, I'm driving around without the black plastic engine cover right now (because I plan on pulling the plugs to check gap..really just being lazy..and refusing to accept I lost a tool)
Man..the engine is alot more noticable, and it sounds pretty good above 2k rpm. Kinda like it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sorry took so long..kinda absent minded...

The gap on the old plugs is .65

Specification is .6 to.65. So technically they are still barely in spec. However considering the new plugs were gapped at .6 (I pulled them and checked) I think Alfa is specifying they be changed before they go out of spec.
 

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2018 Stelvio Ti Montecarlo Blue
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I will say, I replaced mine right around 30k.
I had bought the car second hand after someone else turned it in after lease.
Somewhere I have the pictures of the plugs I took out. They were ready to be replaced.
Like the oil, spark plugs are cheap and easy to replace.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It really is as easy as screwing in and out a really dirty, hard to reach, lightbulb...

But totally understand not being comfortable doing it yourself.


...And so you know the new 2022 maintenance schedule seems to apply to all years. It's a revision now that they have more real world info on how long the parts last. Nothing wrong with following what's in your manual though.
 

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It really is as easy as screwing in and out a really dirty, hard to reach, lightbulb...

But totally understand not being comfortable doing it yourself.


...And so you know the new 2022 maintenance schedule seems to apply to all years. It's a revision now that they have more real world info on how long the parts last. Nothing wrong with following what's in your manual though.
Thank you.

These snaps are from 2019 2.0 manual online and it is the same in my manual book came in the car.
I think I will skip the sparkplugs for the next sevice.
 

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Just want to add that if you do this while you're changing your oil, the 10mm socket will fall straight to the ground, and not get stuck on the belly pan.
I was changing the oil anyway, but I should have dropped the pan first. But if you're not, you'll need that magnet.
 
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