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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have the Stelvio Ti Sport which comes with the sport tuned suspension. My question is, when switching to dynamic mode, does it really change anything in the suspension? I realize the throttle response and shift points change, but I really do not feel any suspension changes. The dealer and Alfa customer service center state it does.
 

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Mine most definitely does, there is a noticeable difference from D to N in the suspension firmness and ride quality. try going over some speed humps in both modes and see if you notice it. I almost always switch to D when I am approaching a hump / speed bump since the ride is so much softer going over it.
 

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the other way I can tell is going around a corner, in N it has a little bit of body roll induced understeer, and in D it rides through the curves flat and smooth. I was so shocked at the difference I had to research how the car was able to affect the understeer to that degree, and it turns out it's purely in the MM control logic of the adjustable damper system. Going into a turn it firms up the outside front damper a lot, goes mid firm on the inside front and outside rear, and soft on the inside rear. I think I recall something like 128 damper adjustments a second being on the spec sheet I found for it. Now I wish I had saved the link...
 
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Someone messaged me saying that the system described in that PDF may not be the system included in the Sport-Tuned Suspension. While I have no idea if that is or is not the case, I wanted to clarify that the PDF linked was something I found while doing a bunch of google searches to try and figure out what type of adaptive suspension is actually in my Stelvio, and how it works. While I have not been able to confirm that document describes the actual system or not, I do feel it does based upon my driving experience with the car (though it is certainly possible it uses some other form of adaptive suspension, and I don't think I would be qualified to tell them apart purely by feel).

In case anyone wanted to know / compare the specific option I have on mine, here's a photo from the window sticker.
20180117_002944.jpg

So in short, the Sport-Tuned Suspension definitely does do something to the suspension when you put it into Dynamic, which results in a firmer and more agile handling of the car, but exactly what that something is may or may not be exactly what's described in that document (though the final product feels very much like that described in it).
 

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Someone messaged me saying that the system described in that PDF may not be the system included in the Sport-Tuned Suspension. While I have no idea if that is or is not the case, I wanted to clarify that the PDF linked was something I found while doing a bunch of google searches to try and figure out what type of adaptive suspension is actually in my Stelvio, and how it works. While I have not been able to confirm that document describes the actual system or not, I do feel it does based upon my driving experience with the car (though it is certainly possible it uses some other form of adaptive suspension, and I don't think I would be qualified to tell them apart purely by feel).

In case anyone wanted to know / compare the specific option I have on mine, here's a photo from the window sticker.
View attachment 2785

So in short, the Sport-Tuned Suspension definitely does do something to the suspension when you put it into Dynamic, which results in a firmer and more agile handling of the car, but exactly what that something is may or may not be exactly what's described in that document (though the final product feels very much like that described in it).

Sport Tuned Suspension is most likely what we know as Active Damper System. Here's the best short explanation ( 40 sec)

 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I agree with Marco ^^^, that is more than likely the way it works. The Stelvio handles very well and that type of system just makes it better.
 

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Sport Tuned Suspension is most likely what we know as Active Damper System. Here's the best short explanation ( 40 sec)
That describes a ferromagnetic fluid based magnetic damper control, which achieves a similar function (at a much higher level of performance and precision), but judging by nearly every manufacturer that installs them, it's usually a top billed feature upgrade, and several thousand dollars worth of upgrade on most cars. While I would be thrilled to learn I have magnetic ride control, I suspect it's a simpler form where it uses an adjustable proportional valve and contains a more standard type of fluid, simply because it's so much cheaper, and the fact they don't brag like crazy it's a magnetic damper (look at every GM or Porsche or Ferrari that has it, they make no secret of it, and charge a huge premium for it.)

I agree with Marco ^^^, that is more than likely the way it works. The Stelvio handles very well and that type of system just makes it better.
Read the PDF I linked to, It is for a electrically controlled damper system dated from 2008, and shows a picture of what I believe is the Alfa Romeo concept vehicle that ultimately birthed the Georgio platform and our Stelvios.
concept.JPG
Again I don't know if it's the exact system we have, but from the research I've done I do think it's a strong likelihood that this is an early technical document for what is probably an earlier generation of the system currently sold as the Sport-Tuned Suspension. My guess is that the future release of a higher end suspension will include either an expanded version of this (or maybe we have a version closer to this 2008 document and the upgrade will be the more current generation one?), or more likely that the upgraded version will in fact be a magnetic ride control based system.
detail.jpg
 

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I can't speak for other models or features offered in another country but here in Canada the Ti Sport package comes with whats called "Frequency Selective Damping Suspension"
It's design is to mimic some of the features of an active suspension in a 100% mechanical way thus removing the cost, complexity and reliability of the electronics/ sensors.
Shock manufacturers always have to weigh the minimal damping for comfort and the high damping for control and cornering and try to find a compromise.
A traditional shocks damping is based on oil flow going through the piston assembly but a FSD shock uses a special valve and a parallel oil flow next to the one going through the piston to delay and build up pressure. This allows the pressure in the piston to change based on the frequency the shock is moving at and offer minimal damping for highway driving and slight road undulations vs the impact of a pothole or the forces of cornering for example.
Sorry, not sure I'm explaining it very well.

The Giulia Ti Sport does have an option for an active suspension which is computer/ sensor controlled and the package will be offered in the Stelvio (late availability. surprise surprise). These vehicles can be identified easily by the additional shock adjustment button in the center of the DNA controller.
 

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Ran it through Google translate.

Alfa Romeo Stelvio Alfa Dynamic Suspension vs. Alfa Active Suspension

Dear Sellers, below you will find the explanation of the Alfa Dynamic Suspension systems (already available on Stelvio) and Alfa Active Suspension (soon available on Stelvio) so that you can adequately illustrate customers in explanation phase of the product.

Alfa Dynamic Suspension
This is a system that, thanks to the use of Frequency Selective Damping (FSD) technology, improves handling and road holding even in non-optimal road surface conditions, all to the advantage of driving comfort. During the normal running of a vehicle, a shock absorber moves in compression and in extension thousands of times the stresses from which a shock absorber is affected have frequencies of various entities: in particular, flat surfaces generate low frequency inputs, while disconnected roads generate input high frequency. Alfa Dynamic Suspension, thanks to a special additional valve that regulates the flow of oil according to road conditions, is able to vary the response of the shock to the advantage of comfort and road holding.

Alfa Dynamic Suspension needs to feel the variation of roughness of the road surface to be able to adapt in a completely mechanical (and hydraulic) damping of the shock absorber; it is not governed by electronic controls and does not interact with Chassis Domain Control.

Alfa Active Suspension is an active and continuous suspension and shock absorber control system that reduces vehicle body oscillations in all driving conditions. He constantly interacts with the CDC and the Alfa DNA Pro and "calibrates his intervention according to the selected mode ..
Page 2
A solenoid valve modifies the hydraulic flow inside the shock, modifying the suspension damping characteristics. The solonoids are managed by the control unit on the basis of control algorithms. The goal is to reduce the fluctuations of the car body in all conditions to the advantage of comfort and handling Alfa Active Suspension will be available during the month of November 2017
 

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That seems to imply a simple two setting suspension setup, which I can believe based upon driving. Perhaps it's lost in translation here, but while it may not "communicate" data to / from the CDC DNA computer, changing the drive mode certainly does initiate the mode change.

So I think from this the final answer is that the sport tuned suspension is not a true "adaptive" suspension, but instead a variable damper suspension with hard and soft suspension settings. The sad thing is that this is more detail than even the service manager at my dealer knows so far... Alfa really needs to work on communications and training of their dealer people.
 

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Thanks, I could not get it to translate for some reason.

The shocks, due to being a FSD design reacts to the force applied to it and can be soft or firm depending on road conditions/ demands. Being a purely mechanical device the shock never changes its operation and acts the same in D, N or A modes.
It's quite possible that the change in feel is due to more spirited driving taking place in D mode and therefore the shock acts stiffer but it would react exactly the same in N mode as well.
 

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Thanks, I could not get it to translate for some reason.

The shocks, due to being a FSD design reacts to the force applied to it and can be soft or firm depending on road conditions/ demands. Being a purely mechanical device the shock never changes its operation and acts the same in D, N or A modes.
It's quite possible that the change in feel is due to more spirited driving taking place in D mode and therefore the shock acts stiffer but it would react exactly the same in N mode as well.

10000% wrong here, there is a significant and immediate difference in the suspension between D and N on mine, everything from speed bumps to potholes to cornering stability changes. the road to my yacht club underwent a ton of construction this summer and it's still all torn up, after which are 10 speed humps to drive over. doing 15mph in D is physically unpleasant on some stretches, plus being worried about the tires, switch to N and it's suddenly comfortable and almost entirely smooth, and with no change in speed at all.

EDIT, wanted to add that I've driven a Stelvio Sport (non Ti) for a full week as well, and it absolutely did NOT have the suspension system I have, there was most definitely no change between N and D there. It's not terribly subtle, it's actually a quite pronounced change on most road surfaces
 
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